The Line Between Real and Rambo

I got talking action movies with a buddy recently, and we got on the subject of where the line of realism versus entertainment lies.  We’re both combat veterans, and we’ve both seen long periods of mind-numbing boredom and moments of chaotic weirdness that happen in combat.

There are often comments on action movies, and action novels, about how “realistic” they are.  And while some things are easy to quantify, some elements aren’t so much.  Including the question, “Just how ‘realistic’ should a piece of action entertainment be?” Continue reading “The Line Between Real and Rambo”

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Why I Write Mercs

 

Mercenaries haven’t really been a staple of mainstream thrillers since the ’80s.  Tom Clancy introduced Jack Ryan, an analyst, as the hero of his techno-thrillers, and it seemed to set the tone for much of the genre to come.  Harold Coyle’s heroes were mostly tankers.  Dale Brown’s were bomber pilots.  As the GWOT got started, even the more shadowy operatives, like Vince Flynn’s Mitch Rapp and Brad Taylor’s Pike Logan were still directly operating within the government apparatus, if so black that they “didn’t exist.”

So, why did I go with mercenaries for the Praetorian series, Kill Yuan, and the Brannigan’s Blackhearts series?  Well, I think that has several answers. Continue reading “Why I Write Mercs”

It is Go Time

Brannigan’s Blackhearts #2 – Burmese Crossfire is now live!  And it’s still $0.99 for a few more days (going up to $3.99 on the 20th).  I approved the proof for the paperback on Saturday, so it’s available too (though still not linked to the Kindle page for some reason).

A Search And Destroy Mission…Deep In Hostile Territory

The Golden Triangle. One of the biggest heroin-producing regions in the world is also home to squabbling ethnic groups, clashing militarist paramilitaries, and Communist rebels.
Drugs are a means to an end. Drugs sell for money. Money buys guns and ammo. It’s how many of the small armies of the region have stayed afloat for so long. And now, another player is getting their hand in. Intelligence suggests that North Korea’s Bureau 39 is hiring out the Light Infantry Guide Bureau as advisors in return for heroin to sell on the black market.
It’s an unacceptable situation, but northern Burma is a long way from support. And the powers that be don’t want the signature on the ground that a full-scale operation might need. So, they’re turning to a man who can get it done on a shoestring, and have a hope of getting back out.

Brannigan’s Blackhearts are going in.

The Guns of Brannigan’s Blackhearts (So Far)

Realized that I could have done this for Fury in the Gulf, but didn’t.  So, with the release of Burmese Crossfire now less than two weeks away, here’s a little gratuitous gun porn covering both of the first two novels in the Brannigan’s Blackhearts series.

Chinese Type 03

Commander Esfandiari’s troops in Fury in the Gulf use Chinese Type 03 rifles.  The ones they use are the export variant, chambered in 5.56.

Russian Makarov

Both the Iranians and the Blackhearts use 9mm Makarovs for sidearms on Khadarkh.

AK-12

The Blackhearts go ashore with top-of-the-line Russian AK-12s, in 5.45. (As shown on the cover.)

PKP Pecheneg

Curtis, being Mr. Machinegunner, carries a PKP Pecheneg on Khadarkh, in 7.62×54.

Type 88

The North Korean advisors in Burma carry Type 88 rifles, an indigenous North Korean AK variant.

Type 73 light machine gun

The Nork advisors also have a couple Type 73s, another indigenous North Korean design.

Type 56

The Kokang Army uses various AK clones, the most common of which is the Chinese Type 56.

HK G3

Since it is commonly used by the Burmese Army, the Blackhearts go in with HK G3s.

Rheinmetall MG3

With a bit more numbers, two of the Blackhearts go into Burma carrying MG3s for fire support.

So, there’s a bit of a look at some of the things that go bang in the Brannigan’s Blackhearts series so far.  Hope everyone’s enjoying Fury in the Gulf, and if you’ve finished, please consider going on Amazon and leaving a review.

Meanwhile, don’t forget that Burmese Crossfire is still only $0.99 for pre-order.  It’ll go up to $3.99 on the 20th.